Software Engineering Institute | Carnegie Mellon University
Software Engineering Institute | Carnegie Mellon University
Skinny Banner for Webinar Series.

How to Effectively Evaluate Software Architecture and Identify Risks

  • September 10, 2009
  • By Felix Bachmann
  • In this 2009 webinar, Felix Bachmann discusses how using the Architecture Tradeoff Analysis Method (ATAM) can help identify risks early in a product's life cycle.
  • Software Architecture
  • Loading the video......
  • Slides
  • Abstract

    Software architecture is critical for business success.  Think about it.  Solid architecture prevents defects and system failures.  It saves money and gets quality products to the market faster. 

    Most software-reliant systems are required to be modifiable and reliable.  They may also need to be secure, interoperable, and portable.  How do you know whether your software architecture is suitable or at risk relative to its target system qualities?  

    The Software Engineering Institute (SEI), is hosting a webinar to discuss how using the Architecture Tradeoff Analysis Method (ATAM) - practical and proven architecture-centric evaluation techniques - can identify risks early in the life cycle.  The SEI ATAM is used widely in many different settings. The ATAM is a tested process that has been used in many evaluations over the past ten or more years.  If executed as defined, good results can almost be guaranteed.

    About Felix H. Bachmann

    Felix H. Bachmann is a Senior Member of the Technical Staff at the Software Engineering Institute (SEI) working in the Product Line Systems Program on both the Architecture Tradeoff Analysis and Product Line Practice Initiatives. There he is the team lead for architecture-centric product line practices, a co-author of the Attribute-Driven Design Method, a contributor to and instructor for the ATAM Evaluator Training, a co-author of Documenting Software Architectures: Views and Beyond, and leading research on an architecture design expert. Before joining the SEI he was a software engineer at the Robert Bosch GmbH in Corporate Research, where he worked with software development departments to address the issues of increased features and higher quality in the call-control software,  the core of telecommunications products. As a result of these efforts, Bosch developed the OTES (Objects Through Essential Services) Method, in which Mr. Bachmann played a decisive role. Mr. Bachmann also defined the corresponding software development process that describes in three levels how to develop high quality software in a timely fashion. Later he was a Resident Affiliate for Bosch at the SEI where he managed a collaboration in software architecture and product lines that was aimed at applying the SEI technology and methods in these areas within Bosch business units. Bachmann began his career in 1977, educating service staff on determining and rectifying software errors in the first computer controlled telecommunication systems.